Artists Exhibitions Hannah Hoffman News Fairs

Now on view

Lavinia

03.30.24–05.04.24

Matt Sheridan Smith
07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 80 x 56 x 1.5 inches (203.2 x 142.2 x 3.8 cm)

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 80 x 56 x 1.5 inches (203.2 x 142.2 x 3.8 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 80 x 56 x 1.5 inches (203.2 x 142.2 x 3.8 cm)

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 80 x 56 x 1.5 inches (203.2 x 142.24 x 3.8 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Scratch (untitled), 2014. Paper mounted to aluminum. 50 3/4 x 35 3/4 x 1.5 inches (128.9 x 90.8 x 3.8 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Scratch (untitled), 2014. Paper mounted to aluminum. 50 3/4 x 35 3/4 x 1.5 inches (128.9 x 90.805 x 3.8 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Scratch (bulles), 2014. Paper mounted to aluminum. 35 3/4 x 50 3/4 x 1.5 inches (90.8 x 128.9 x 3.8 cm)

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Scratch (hand), 2014.Paper mounted to aluminum. 50 3/4 x 35 3/4 x 1.5 inches (128.9 x 90.8 x 3.8 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Portrait, 2014. Plywood, digital print, paste, polished aluminum. 64 x 48 inches (162.6 x 121.9 cm)

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Installation view: Matt Sheridan Smith. 07.12.14 – 08.23.14

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 60 x 42 x 1.5 inches (152.4 x 106.7 x 3.8 cm)

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Untitled, 2014. Paper, acrylic medium, hyoscyamus niger, (henbane / fetid nightshade). Dimensions variable.

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Matt Sheridan Smith, Pattern portrait (widow), 2014. Acrylic gel medium transfer, paper, linen. 80 x 56 x 1.5 inches (203.2 x 142.2 x 3.8 cm)

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Exhibition information

“As the widow awoke one morning from uneasy dreams she found herself transformed in her bed into a Figure.”

 

Together, these works attempt a sort of speculative portraiture (1). These portraits present themselves as so many still lives, backdrops, kits, all on hold, waiting for a performance that does not come. In playing on the conceptual and rhetorical limits of portraiture, the works, instead of combining signs, accumulate residues: textures, patterns frozen in repetition, solid and liquid elements, objects and substances that depict presence and absence, fiction and fact, positing imagination and memory as nothing more than various states of viscosity.

 

A pattern, generally a form reserved for standing in for content, stands in instead for a figure, a hole, capable of prompting an emergence, yet always ready (and perhaps more likely) to retreat into the decorative. This movement is both encouraged and disrupted by the persistent presence of a rubbing, scratching, busy hand, entered from somewhere else, sketching out the sensorial, sometime else. Drawing empty, casting a hole: an absence, marked by recent presence, distant use, a hand, a scent, a touch.

 

[A xerox laid face down in acrylic medium, then allowed to dry before the paper is made wet again and rubbed away, leaving only the image, and traces of paper and acrylic. These touchpoints of paper (impermanence) and removal by rubbing (pathos) are key to the artists process and result in highly tactile and haptic works. This fixation on touch is echoed by a series of drawings in which scratch off ink is rubbed and scratched away to create a sort of inverted drawing, marks made by lifting rather than laying down, there’s a lot of laying down, we’re often happier horizontal.]

 

Portraiture is further parsed into other, more forensic dimensions: alongside the portraiture patterns are objects, uses, methods, decapitations (2), dirt, the remains of champagne’s own bloody neck(3), poisonous plants—deadly- (atropa belladonna)(4) and fetid-nightshade (hyoscyamus niger)(5). Things, these lesser bodies in space, trace together the outlines of a setting, a scene, that refuses to declare whether it’s the station of arrival, awaiting its figure, the true body, or a staging/restaging of its own site of disappearance.

 

___________________________________

 

(1) “What is a hole?” a clown asked his partner in a ring at the Circus Medrano. Having thus quite confused the fellow, he wasted no time in lording it over him: “a hole,” he said, “is an absence surrounded by presence.” For me, this is an example of a perfect definition, and I will use it to define the object of my interest. A ghost is indeed a hole; but a hole to which are attributed intentions, a sensibility, morals; a hole, that is, an absence—but the absence of someone and not of something—surrounded by presence—by the presence of one or several. A ghost is an absent being amidst present beings. And it is the pierced substance that determines the shape of the hole and not the absence which that presence surrounds—for it is only in jest that some tell of cannons of bygone days that foundry workers made by taking holes and pouring bronze around them—when we endow ghosts with intentions, a sensibility, and morals, these attributes reside not in the absent beings, but in the present ones that surround the ghosts. —Rene Daumal, “The Pataphysics of Ghosts”

 

(2) The inside pressure of a typical Champagne bottle is around 620 kilopascals (90 psi). The diameter of the opening is 18 millimetres (0.71 in), so there is a force of about 160 newtons (36 lbf) trying to push the cork out of the bottle. At the opening of the bottle, there is a lip that creates a stress concentration. On the vertical seam of the bottle there is a thin, faintly visible, prepared seam, which creates a second stress concentration. At the intersection of the seam and the lip, both stress concentrations combine and the strength of the glass is reduced by more than fifty percent. The impact of the saber on this weak point creates a crack that rapidly propagates through the glass, fueled by the momentum of the saber and the pressure in the bottle. Once the crack has severed the top from the bottle, the pressure inside the bottle and the transferred momentum from the saber will send the top flying, typically for a distance of 5–10 metres (16–33 ft).

 

(3) After aging, the lees must be consolidated for removal. The bottles undergo a process known as riddling (remuage in French).[5] In this stage, the bottles are placed on special racks called pupitres that hold them at a 45° angle, with the crown cap pointed down. Once a day (every two days for Champagne), the bottles are given a slight shake and turn, alternatively on right then left, and dropped back into the pupitres, with the angle gradually increased. The drop backinto the rack causes a slight tap, pushing sediments toward the neck of the bottle. In 10 to 14 days (8 to 10 weeks for Champagne), the position of the bottle is straight down, with the lees settled in the neck.

 

The lees removal process is called disgorging (dégorgement in French), traditionally a skilled manual process where the crown cap and lees are removed without losing much of the liquid, and a varying amount of sugar added. Before the invention of this process by Madame Clicquot in 1816, Champagne was cloudy; this style is seen occasionally today, under the label méthode ancestrale. Modern automated disgorgement is done by freezing a small amount of the liquid in the neck and removing this plug of ice containing the lees.

 

(4) The name Atropa is thought to be derived from that of the Greek goddess Atropos, one of the three Greek fates or destinies who would determine the course of a man’s life by the weaving of threads that symbolized his birth, the events in his life, and finally his death, with Atropos cutting these threads to mark the last of these.[12][13] The name “belladonna” comes from the Italian language, meaning “beautiful lady”;[10] originating either from its usage as cosmetic for the face or, more probably, from its usage to increase the pupil size in women.

 

(5) The first element of the plant name henbane seems to go back to the root *hen- ‘death,’ preserved in the names of places, people, and gods. Originally, henbane was called hen-bell, ‘death bell’. Once the meaning *hen- ‘murder, death’ had been forgotten, an association of hen- with the bird hen arose, henbell became opaque (no connection can be established between hens and bells), and the second element was replaced with -bane. The resulting compound is tautological from the historical point of view (‘death-murder’ or ‘death-death’). The belief that henbane is particularly poisonous to domestic fowls is due to an attempt to rationalize the otherwise incomprehensible word.

Past exhibitions

Isabelle Cornaro
01.23.16 – 03.19.16

Olga Balema
On The Brink Of My Sexy Apocalypse
01.25.17 – 03.11.17

Current

Lavinia
03.30.24 – 06.04.24

2024

D’Ette Nogle
MATERIALOUTPOST: IN-COUNTRY
02.23.24 – 02.24.24

Kate Mosher Hall
Never Odd or Even
02.17.24 – 03.23.24

2023

Rosemary Mayer
Noon Has No Shadows
11.12.23 – 12.23.23

Monica Majoli
Space of the Line: Ben, Rameses, Tom
09.12.23 – 10.14.23

Luz Carabaño
encuentros

09.09.23 – 10.21.23

Dominique Knowles
My Beloved
06.03.23 08.05.23

Olga Balema
Loon

04.08.23 05.20.23

Darrel Ellis
01.28.23 03.18.23

2022

Elaine Cameron-Weir
Exploded View / Dressing for Windows
11.12.22 – 01.14.23

Sarah Pucci and Dorothy Iannone
Organized by Scott Portnoy
09.10.22 – 10.22.22

Sweet Days of Discipline
07.16.22 – 08.20.22

Ann Craven
Flowers (Watercolors)
06.04.22 – 07.09.22

Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo)
04.16.22 – 05.21.22

Rochelle Feinstein
You Again
02.12.22 – 03.26.22

2021

Raphaela Simon
Steine
12.11.21 – 01.29.22

Anita Steckel
09.11.21 – 11.13.21

Tony Cokes
Evil.80 Empathy?
06.28.21 – 08.1.21

Talia Chetrit
DICKERING
06.19.21 – 08.14.21

Kate Mosher Hall
Without a body, without Bill
02.20.21 – 04.24.21

2020

Alvin Baltrop
11.21.20 – 01.23.21

Hardy Hill
The Easy Yoke
02.28.20 – 04.11.20

Barbara Kasten
Chroma
02.11.20 – 04.04.20

2019

California Winter
11.08.19 – 12.21.19

Tony Cokes
Della’s House
02.12.19 – 03.22.19

D’Ette Nogle
D’Ette Nogle, 2019
01.29.19 – 04.27.19

2018

Adam Linder
FOOTNOTE SERVICE: SOME TRADE
04.28.18 – 04.29.18

Gallery Share
03.04.18 – 03.31.18

D’Ette Nogle
Wardrobe Selections for Gallery (2013-2018)
03.04.18 – 03.31.18

2017

Andy Robert
LAKOU: One, Two, Fifth
12.15.17 – 02.28.18

Elaine Cameron-Weir
wave form walks the earth
09.17.17 – 11.22.17

Rey Akdogan
07.08.17 – 08.26.17

Joe Zorrilla
Condo New York, hosted by Bortolami Gallery
06.29.17 – 07.28.17

TOUCHPIECE
Curated by Justin Beal
05.21.17 – 06.24.17

Ryan Mrozowski
03.18.17 – 04.29.17

Olga Balema
On The Brink Of My Sexy Apocalypse
01.25.17 – 03.11.17

2016

Paul Thek
11.12.16 – 01.07.17

Sam Falls
09.16.16 – 10.29.16

Barbara Kasten
“I want the eyes to open” – Josef Albers
07.23.16 – 09.10.16

A Change of Heart
Curated by Chris Sharp
06.04.16 – 07.16.16

Ben Schumacher
Motor Earth
04.02.16 – 05.21.16

Raphaela Simon
Tischlein deck dich
04.02.16 – 05.21.16

Isabelle Cornaro
01.23.16 – 03.19.16

2015

Daniel Buren, Sam Lewitt, Wilfredo Prieto, Charles Ray, Pamela Rosenkranz, Joe Zorrilla
11.21.15 – 01.16.16

John Finneran
Dreamers at the Gates of Where Dreamers Are
09.19.15 – 10.31.15

Margaret Lee and Emily Sundblad
You Can Teach an Old Zebra New Tricks
08.07.15 – 09.12.15

Joe Zorrilla
05.02.15 – 07.03.15

Gerhard Richter
Overpainted Photographs
03.21.15 – 04.18.15

Ryan Foerster
03.21.15 – 04.18.15

Various Artist
IMAGE SEARCH
01.01.15 – 02.28.15

2014

Ann Craven
11.15.14 – 12.20.14

Sam Falls
09.05.14 – 10.25.14

Matt Sheridan Smith
07.12.14 – 08.23.14

Joe Zorrilla
06.06.14

Isabelle Cornaro
03.04.14 – 04.19.14

Rey Akdogan
05.03.14 – 06.21.14

The Body Issue
01.11.14 – 02.15.14

2013

Jörg Immendorff
10.04.23 – 12.07.13

Sam Falls, Jacob Kassay, Matt Sheridan Smith, Joe Zorrilla
07.23.13 – 09.21.13

Mira Schendel
Mira Schendel
05.21.13 – 07.13.13

2024

Dominique Knowles at Klima Biennale Wien
04.06.2024 – 07.14.2024
Elaine Cameron-Weir in Frieze
04.03.2024
Monica Majoli in Contemporary Art Quarterly Archive
04.03.2024
Elaine Cameron-Weir in The Brooklyn Rail
04.01.2024
Kate Mosher Hall, Juliana Halpert and Olivia Mole in Conversation
03.23.24
Kate Mosher Hall in Mousse
03.18.24
Tony Cokes and Rochelle Feinstein at Kunsthaus Baselland
04.13.2024 – 08.18.2024
Olga Balema at Hessel Museum of Art
04.06.2024 – 06.26.2024
Kate Mosher Hall in Autre
03.15.2024
Olga Balema at Cooper Brovenick
03.15.2024 – 03.23.2024
Dominique Knowles at David Peter Francis
03.14.2024 – 04.20.2024
Kate Mosher Hall in Carla
03.13.2024
Ann Craven at Phillida Reid
03.09.2024 – 04.13.2024
Maren Karlson in Flaunt
03.09.2024
Elaine Cameron-Weir in Ocula
03.07.2024
D'Ette Nogle in Interview Magazine
03.07.2024
Elaine Cameron-Weir at Lisson gallery
03.07.2024 – 04.13.2024
Ann Craven in Artlyst
03.04.204
Kate Mosher Hall in Frieze Magazine
02.29.2024
Olga Balema at Woonhuis de Ateliers
02.29.2024 – 04.20.2024
Hannah Hoffman in ARTnews
02.27.2024
Tony Cokes at Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum
02.23.2024 – 07.29.2024
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in Family Style
02.22.2024
Hannah Hoffman in ARTnews
02.22.2024
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in Frieze
02.16.2024
Elaine Cameron-Weir in artnet
02.14.2024
Tony Cokes at MUDAM
02.09.2024 – 09.08.2024
Ann Craven in Santa Barbara Independent
02.05.2024
Tony Cokes in Hyperallergic
01.31.2024
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in MOMUS
01.19.2024
Tony Cokes in e-Flux
01.17.2024
Olga Balema in the New York Times
01.04.2024
Kate Mosher Hall in Frieze
01.03.2024
Rosemary Mayer in Artillery Magazine
01.02.2024

2023

Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in CURA
12.23.2023
Elaine Cameron-Weir in Artnet
12.22.2023
Rosemary Mayer in LA Review of Book
12.18.2023
Ann Craven in the Brooklyn Rail
12.14.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in BOMB Magazine
12.14.2023
Olga Balema in the New York Times
12.13.2023
Barbara Kasten in Artnews
12.13.2023
Darrel Ellis in the New York Times
12.13.2023
Rosemary Mayer in Frieze
12.07.2023
Rosemary Mayer in Mousse
12.06.2023
Monica Majoli in Artforum
11.30.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in FAD Magazine
11.28.2023
Dominique Knowles in Cultured
11.27.2023
Tony Cokes at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
11.23.2024 – 04.01.2024
Rosemary Mayer in LA Downtown News
11.20.2023
Rosemary Mayer in Insider
11.20.2023
Tony Cokes in E-Flux
11.20.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in Cultured
11.17.2023
Rosemary Mayer in Hyperallergic
11.02.2023
Tony Cokes in The Brooklyn Rail
11.01.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in Numero
10.20.2023
Darrel Ellis in OnMilwaukee
10.19.2023
Luz Carabaño in Hyperallergic
10.09.2023
Kate Mosher Hall in Artforum
10.05.2023
Tony Cokes at Moderna Museet
09.30.2023 – 09.22.2024
Tony Cokes at Museion Foundation
09.30.2023 – 02.25.2024
Luz Carabaño in Flaunt
09.22.2023
Rochelle Feinstein at Mehdi Chouakri
09.12.2023 – 11.04.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in NY Times
09.17.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in Latina
09.09.2023
Anita Steckel at Wonnerth Dejaco
09.08.2023 – 10.14.2023
Barbara Kasten at Bortolami
09.08.2023 – 10.28.2023
Kate Mosher Hall at Miguel Abreu
09.08.2023 – 10.21.2023
Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) in NY Times
09.07.2023
Dominique Knowles in Texte Zur Kunst
09.05.2023
Tony Cokes at DIA Bridgehampton
08.26.2023
Dominique Knowles in Elephant
07.12.2023
Dominique Knowles in LA Times
07.05.2023
Raphaela Simon and Andy Robert at Michael Werner Gallery
06.24.2023 – 09.09.2023
Darrel Ellis in ARTnews.com
23.06.2023
Tony Cokes at DIA Bridgehampton
06.23.2023 – 05.2023

Artists

Rey Akdogan Olga Balema Elaine Cameron-Weir Luz Carabaño Talia Chetrit Tony Cokes Ann Craven Darrel Ellis Rochelle Feinstein Kate Mosher Hall Maren Karlson Barbara Kasten Dominique Knowles Adam Linder D’Ette Nogle Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo) Andy Robert Raphaela Simon Anita Steckel Joe Zorrilla

Works by

Paul Thek Alvin Baltrop

2024


Frieze LA
02.29.24 – 03.03.24

2023

Tony Cokes and Dominique Knowles
Paris + Art Basel
10.18.23 – 10.22.23
Caitlin MacQueen and Puppies Puppies (Jade Guanaro Kuriki-Olivo)
The Dallas Invitational Art Fair
04.22.23 – 04.23.23

Frieze LA
02.16.23 – 02.19.23

2022

Rochelle Feinstein
Art Basel Miami Beach
12.01.22 – 12.03.22
Olga Balema, Ann Craven, Caitlin Macqueen and Anita Steckel
Paris + Art Basel
10.19.22 – 10.23.22
Kate Mosher Hall
Frieze NY
05.18.22 – 05.22.22
Elaine Cameron-Weir
(Shared with LambdaLambdaLambda who presented Nora Turato)
Frieze LA
02.17.22 – 02.20.22

2021

Olga Balema
(with Bridget Donahue Gallery)
Frieze NY
05.05.21 – 05.09.21

2020

Barbara Kasten
(with Bortolami Gallery)
Frieze LA - Projects
02.14.20 – 02.16.20
Andy Robert
Cape Town Art Fair
02.14.20 – 02.16.20

2019

D'Ette Nogle and Marcel Broodthaers
June
06.10.19 – 06.14.19
Andy Robert
Frieze NY
05.02.19 – 05.05.19
Group presentation
Frieze LA
02.15.19 - 02.17.19

2018

Olga Balema and Andy Robert
Paris Avant-Première
10.12.18 – 10.18.18
Olga Balema
Art Basel Hong Kong
03.27.18 – 03.31.18